1

What would be a word that suggests that a situation is ironic but also strongly implies that karma was at work?

The specific context is as follows: An individual makes an unethical choice and follows through with the action of the choice in such a way that would normally benefit the individual. An unexpected result of the same choice causes the same individual to experience the same negative side effects as others would experience except "in spades" implying that "Karma was at work." At any rate they would have experienced the fruit of their actions.

I have looked over various synonyms of irony and karma. "Wages," "fruit," "deserts," and suggested by Adrian Larson in the comments, "comeuppance," work well to imply the karma aspect; however, I have trouble finding a word that also seems to have a strong sense of irony to it.

5
  • I wonder if you're thinking of hubris.
    – Chris H
    Commented Aug 27, 2016 at 9:49
  • Perhaps comeuppance? Commented Aug 27, 2016 at 23:21
  • Thank you for your question. We are looking for thoughtful, intriguing questions posed as you would ask them of an expert, including evidence that you have put effort and research into the question. Please edit to share the results of your research. Questions which lack results of research may be closed. (more) A dictionary or thesaurus may be quite helpful. Your question should include the results of your search. It should also explain why the results were not adequate to answer your question.
    – MetaEd
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 16:25
  • @ChrisH Not the work for which I was looking; however, it would have came in handy during the conversation.
    – redmasq
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 16:35
  • @AdrianLarson I like that word; however, as far as I can tell, it does not have a sense of irony to it. Thank you
    – redmasq
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 16:36

1 Answer 1

1

I think you're looking for poetic justice. Wikipedia does a good job of describing it:

Poetic justice is a literary device in which ultimately virtue is rewarded and vice punished. In modern literature it is often accompanied by an ironic twist of fate related to the character's own action.

1
  • This seems to work. I am not sure why I could not remember that term. Thank you
    – redmasq
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 17:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.