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I want to express a situation to a friend saying the following:

I have received two offers. The first one is of a good salary, but I did not like the city, while regarding the 2nd offer, it is of a lower salary but the city is awesome. I do not know whether or not I should sacrifice the salary for living in a nice city.

I would like to find an alternative word for the word "sacrifice" in the last sentence, and I do not know if my attempt is right or wrong. My attempt to re-write the last sentence is:

I do not know whether or not I should forgo the salary for living in a nice city.

Please help me to find the best alternative for the word "sacrifice" in the last sentence.

  • In those situations, "sacrifice" is as common as "trade-off". In either case, you'll probably want to say something about sacrificing the "higher" salary for the awesome city, not sacrificing the salary for the city. Best of luck! :-) – Kristina Lopez Aug 26 '16 at 18:59
  • "I do not know whether or not i should make salary concessions for living in a nice city" – Graffito Aug 26 '16 at 19:36
  • @KristinaLopez thank you for ur comment. do u mean that the sentence should be as follows: I do not know whether or not i should trad-off the salary for living in a nice city? – Elpharaoh Aug 26 '16 at 19:49
  • Sure...but maybe use it this way, "I'm not sure if the nicer city is a good trade-off for a higher salary." – Kristina Lopez Aug 26 '16 at 20:14
  • Please do not ask for help writing (or proofreading). They are out of scope and your question may be removed. (more) – MetaEd Aug 26 '16 at 21:20
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Sacrifice and forgo both seem like perfectly good choices.

Trade-off (or tradeoff) would be a good possibility, but the dictionaries I've checked define it only as a noun. See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trade-off, http://www.thefreedictionary.com/tradeoff, http://www.dictionary.com/browse/tradeoff?s=t>, http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/trade-off?q=tradeoff. Given that, you could use trade off as two separate words:

I don't know if I should trade off the higher salary for living in a nicer city.

I don't know if I should trade off living in a nicer city for the higher salary.

You could also use compromise or exchange:

I don't know if I should compromise the higher salary for living in a nicer city.

I don't know if I should exchange the higher salary for living in a nicer city.

Of these options, I would go with trade off (which is a slight twist on the suggestion of @KristinaLopez -- noun versus verb issue).

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Sacrifice often has the connotation of giving up something you already had:

To surrender or give up (something) for the attainment of some higher advantage or dearer object.

If I had a well-paying job in a crummy city, and I was offered a worse-paying job in a preferable city, I might consider sacrificing my high salary for the better living conditions.

Forgo, on the other hand, has the connotation of not partaking in something that you do not yet have:

To abstain from, go without, deny to oneself; to let go or pass, omit to take or use; to give up, part with, relinquish, renounce, resign.

I think that "forgo" is a better choice here, since you do not yet have either job. That said, both options would be perfectly understandable.

(Both definitions are from the OED.)

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I agree with Michael Seifert on this one.

You are comparing the pros and cons of these two job opportunities. And you can't really sacrifice something you don't have. So your sentence could look something like:

"I have received two offers. The first one is of a good salary, but I did not like the city, while regarding the 2nd offer, it is of a lower salary but the city is awesome. I do not know whether or not if I should [settle for a lower salary, so I can live] in a nice city."

I say settle, because when you settle for something, you are accepting or agreeing to something that is less than satisfactory.

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