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I'm looking for a synonym for "total", as in sum of multiple of parts, but with a negative connotation. The context is that a man finds all his sins combined—his total—in tangible form.

My first thought was culmination, but it doesn't have negative connotation. Any suggestions? What other words would work here?

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    litany is often used to describe a list of crimes. – stevesliva Aug 26 '16 at 1:10
  • Now considered obsolete, grievance used to be used this way. It would help if you added a sample sentence with a blank in it. It's hard to get the sense of what you need. – Phil Sweet Aug 26 '16 at 4:20
  • Actually, aggrievance is more often the non-count sense of wrongfulness. But it's still obsolete. – Phil Sweet Aug 26 '16 at 4:28
  • Thank you for your question. Word requests are out of scope, unless they are expert-level, particularly interesting, unique, and thought-provoking, and show effort and research. (more¹) (more²) (more³) A dictionary or thesaurus may be quite helpful. Your question should include the results of your search. – MetaEd Aug 26 '16 at 15:22
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A word for the sum of all your sins? "burden" has a somewhat negative connotation and is used figuratively.

  • "burden" - (noun) something that is emotionally difficult to bear.

or if you mean your liability to sin, "peccability" may fit.

  • peccability - capability of sinning; the common peccability of mankind.
  • Don't know where, and this could be a false memory, but I seem to recall seeing "the burden of his sins hung over him" or something similar. – pyobum Aug 26 '16 at 8:16
  • @pyobum Could it be in The Bible? – Centaurus Aug 26 '16 at 16:00
  • It certainly would make sense for it to show up in the Bible, but I haven't read the Bible in a very long time... – pyobum Aug 26 '16 at 16:32
  • @pyobum, could it be from the dictionary? The very oldest attestation of burden in the OED is "c971 Blickl. Hom. 75 Swa sæt þonne seo unaræfnedlice byrþen synna on eallum þysum menniscan cynne." Translated, "So sat, then, the intolerable burden of sins on all mankind [until the coming] of our Lord Jesus Christ." (R. Morris tr., PDF available at google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://…) OP, feel free to add if helpful. – 1006a Aug 27 '16 at 19:37
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With actual crimes it's called a rap sheet. Maybe you can use that.

And there, on the table, he found the rap sheet of his sins.

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For your specific use ("a man finds all his sins combined—his total—in tangible form"), I think manifestation would work perfectly.

Consider the various meanings of "manifestation" (from thefreedictionary.com):

  • An indication of the existence, reality, or presence of something
  • One of the forms in which someone or something, such as a person, a divine being, or an idea, is revealed
  • The materialized form of a spirit

Note that "manifestation" (and the verb "manifest") often have an otherwordly/supernatural connotation (e.g. the manifestation of a ghost, spirit, deity, etc.) that would mesh well with a person seeing their sins in a tangible form.

On top of that, for the noun "manifest," we have (also from thefreedictionary.com):

  • A list of cargo or passengers carried on a ship or plane.
  • An invoice of goods carried on a truck or train.

This meaning of "manifest" as a list (invoice) of items (goods, cargo, passengers, sins) carried can rather neatly be applied to the "total/combined sum" of his sins--his sinvoice, if you will. Furthermore, there is a common notion in many religions of "carrying one's sin."

Though "manifestation" lacks an overtly negative connotation, I believe it would work well in the context you described.

Rough example sentence, assuming that the sins have taken a person-like form:

When he opened his eyes, Chad was horrified to see the manifestation of his sins standing over him.

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Consider the following:

"You are fettered," said Scrooge, trembling. "Tell me why?" "I wear the chain I forged in life," replied the Ghost. "I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.” (A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens, 1843)

Your question:

I'm looking for a synonym for "total", as in sum of multiple of parts, but with a negative connotation. The context is that a man finds all his sins combined — his total — in tangible form."

Given that, you might want to consider chains. The length and weight represent your "total"; the links and other attachments represent your "multiple of parts".

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With regard to the OP's question:

I'm looking for a synonym for "total", as in sum of multiple of parts, but with a negative connotation. The context is that a man finds all his sins combined—his total—in tangible form.

According to Merriam-Webster:

sin: an offense against religious or moral law

moral: of or relating to principles of right and wrong in behavior

morality: beliefs about what is right behavior and what is wrong behavior

immoral: conflicting with generally or traditionally held moral principles

immorality: the quality or state of being immoral

Immoral and immorality certainly have negative connotations for those who believe in sin and hold beliefs about what is right behavior and what is wrong behavior, whatever their specific beliefs.

It would seem, then, that the more sins one has, and the more serious those sins are, the more immoral one is. So, perhaps:

The sum total of all one's sins is a measure of one's immorality.

or, simpler,

The sum total of all one's sins is one's immorality per se.

If this makes sense, one can think of one's immorality as a total sinfulness index (TSI). I suppose if one repents one's sins, one's TSI decreases accordingly.

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