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Brand new, at least in my eyes, has two different possible meanings.

The phrase "Brand new" can be defined either as a product of a new brand, or a new product of an already existing brand. Both meanings could be used simultaneously when referring to a product of a new brand, since that product would also technically be a new product, unless of course the product the new brand creates was already a product a different brand already created.

Are both meanings correct? Can both be used interchangeably to describe any new product? Are there more meanings to the phrase "brand new", and is there a possibility that only one of these two definitions of "brand new" is correct?

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  • This: ""Brand new" can be defined either as a product of a new brand doesn't seem right to me - can you expand on this? – Max Williams Aug 24 '16 at 8:17
  • I'd say that 'brand' just means that it's come from a manufacturer, as opposed to handmade. If I make myself a stool, even if it's from new wood, the stool isn't 'brand new'. It's just 'new'. If I buy one from IKEA, the 'brand' applies. I've never heard it carry any sense of a 'new brand'. – JHCL Aug 24 '16 at 8:21
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    The idiom "brand new", as an adjective, simply means something which is (ostensibly) substantially different from previous items of the same class. It is also an incredibly overused/abused term and nearly meaningless. The term has nothing to do with "brand" as used to refer to a manufacturer's mark. – Hot Licks Aug 24 '16 at 12:22
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Brand new is an idiomatic expression that means:

  • completely new, especially not yet used:
    • How can he afford to buy himself a brand new car?
    • Her coat looked as if it was brand new.

Cambridge Dictionary

The expression you are referring to according to your description is:

new product and new brand product

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