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We know that a noun phrase contains at least a noun or a pronoun and for the most part, these phrases can be replaced by a pronoun.

Ex: "We spoke to [the old guy that lives in the little shed on the last farm to the left.]

I made that example long just to illustrate the potential of a noun phrase.

But what about this?

I already spoke to [the good-for-nothing slob.]

Is "good for nothing" modifying slob as an adjective?

If so, is the entire phrase an adjectival phrase within a noun phrase?

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    Anything hyphenated is a single compound word. So good-for-nothing is an adjective, but not a phrase. If it followed slob instead of preceding it, it would be a phrase and wouldn't be hyphenated: a slob good for nothing, which is short for a relative clause a slob (that/who is) good for nothing that's been reduced to a phrase by Whiz-Deletion. – John Lawler Aug 16 '16 at 15:07
  • "the good-for-nothing slob" is a noun phrase with three parts: determiner (the) + adjective (good-for-nothing) + noun (slob) – GoldenGremlin Aug 16 '16 at 15:50
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    ok, so far im getting that it is a compound word and since it is hylhenated it acts as a single word. On e person is tellig me it is an adjective, the other is saying it is a noun phrase...are both answers right? – Akiman Barwa Aug 16 '16 at 16:53
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    I take it back. The entire statement is a noun lhrase meanwhile "goodfornothing" would be the compund word acting as an adjective. – Akiman Barwa Aug 16 '16 at 16:56
  • Sounds like you got it! – GoldenGremlin Aug 16 '16 at 17:12
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Anything hyphenated is a single compound word. So good-for-nothing is an adjective, but not a phrase. If it followed slob instead of preceding it, it would be a phrase and wouldn't be hyphenated: a slob good for nothing, which is short for a relative clause a slob (that/who is) good for nothing that's been reduced to a phrase by Whiz-Deletion. – John Lawler

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