2

My question is if a comma is needed before and in the sentence below. Is there a better way to join these two thoughts other than to use a comma?

A court may choose to not invalidate such a statute and instead hold that certain applications are unconstitutional.

For example, would this be a proper way to join these sentences without a conjunction?

A court may choose to not invalidate such a statute, instead holding that certain applications are unconstitutional.

  • I assume you mean 'statute'; otherwise, either is fine. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 14 '16 at 20:55
  • You could also put a comma before "and" and after "instead," but I suspect doing so would be more appropriate for speaking than writing (since in speaking, the commas tend to emphasize the contrast between choosing and holding). – rhetorician Aug 14 '16 at 23:36
1

Grammatically, the sentence was fine (except for the unnecessarily split infinitive) as first written. Here you have a single subject with a compound verb: COURT MAY CHOOSE AND HOLD. The comma-conjunction joining you asked about would be used where there is a second full clause.

|improve this answer|||||
0

Block quote

A court may choose to not invalidate such a statute, holding instead that certain applications are unconstitutional.

Block quote

Just a small reflow.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.