3

In the captioned sentence:

You don’t have a clue where your money is.

If "where your money is" is a nominal clause, what is its relationship to "clue"?

I am thinking maybe the nominal clause is an adjectival clause, acting as an adjective predicative to the noun "clue".

  • 4
    Have a clue is a negative-polarity idiom that is equivalent to know, be aware. As such, it has many of the same affordances as know, including the ability to take a wh-clause complement. I.e, the sentence means "You don't know where your money is", and the wh-clause is clearly the direct object of know. – John Lawler Aug 11 '16 at 22:06
  • The word clueless has a meaning that is related to this idiom — when applied to a person, it means uninformed, ignorant, confused, or even stupid. – Scott Aug 12 '16 at 0:38
  • "Where your money is" is the type of clue you don't have. – Hot Licks Sep 30 '16 at 18:10
  • And the wh-clause is also called an embedded question. – Greg Lee Sep 30 '16 at 18:32
  • @GregLee - Except that that terminology is misleading -- there is no question. – Hot Licks Sep 30 '16 at 19:55
1

Have a clue is a negative-polarity idiom that is equivalent to know, be aware. As such, it has many of the same affordances as know, including the ability to take a wh-clause complement. I.e, the sentence means "You don't know where your money is", and the wh-clause is clearly the direct object of know. – John Lawler

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.