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This question already has an answer here:

Often, I encounter situations (particularly with software or electronics, though occasionally with people) where bugs or strange events happen that cause me to lose trust in said software maintaining the integrity of my data, or said technology being reliable 'in the clutch' (or even scenarios where a person or business entity change a predictable, relied-on pattern of behavior, belief or expectation).

Sometimes I feel so strongly about the broken trust, that I feel forced to stop trusting (even if such events leading to the distrust were unintentional). I may still use said software, but I continue to do so very cautiously at that point.

The word I believe I'm looking for is similar to 'ized' words, in that it describes a state of 'forced distrust' assigned to myself, not the state or act of the object/person breaking the trust (e.g. "I've been/become xxxxxxxized by such-and-such...").

I often want to use the word 'disenfranchised' to describe such a state, but I'm not sure that's 100% suitable to the various contexts or the concept of lost trust (even though whatever trust I had was likely unfounded anyway, simply because, at least in the context of software, that trust is simply the lack of distrust due to having not yet experienced any bugs/issues that have built up a negative rapport with said software and what I expect it to do without fail).

So what's the word I'm looking for, if such a single word exists?

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Mitch, Phil Sweet, user66974 Aug 9 '16 at 7:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Do you think a single word meaning "made suspicious" would fit? Or something along the lines of "paranoid"? Paranoid has an implication that the distrust is based on non-rational reasoning, so it's not right, but might be in the right direction. – Max Williams Aug 8 '16 at 11:01
  • Those are okay, but I think the word I'm looking for is perhaps not as common, and sounds a bit more sophisticated (like 'disenfranchised'). – purefusion Aug 8 '16 at 11:15
  • No worries. Faith and trust can potentially have different contextual implications, and there's still value to others searching for this using the term trust, rather than faith, since the other post didn't include 'trust' in the content (which may also explain why my own search came up empty). Cheers. – purefusion Aug 8 '16 at 12:06
  • ...situations (particularly with software or electronics) where bugs or strange events happen that cause me to lose trust in said software maintaining the integrity of my data, or said technology being reliable 'in the clutch' Do you mean like Delta's computer system today? – WBT Aug 8 '16 at 15:10
  • Here's what George W. Bush would say: "There's an old saying in Tennessee—I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee—that says, 'Fool me once, shame on ... shame on you. It fooled me, we can't get fooled again!'" – Sven Yargs Aug 9 '16 at 7:29
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You're disillusioned.

disillusioned adj

having lost one's ideals, illusions, or false ideas about someone or something; disenchanted

{Collins English Dictionary}

disillusioned (adjective) disenchanted, disappointed, enlightened, indifferent, disabused, sadder and wiser ...

{Collins Thesaurus of the English Language}

  • 2
    Yes, I believe 'disillusioned' might just be the word I was looking for. 'Sadder and wiser' is painfully humorous, too. Thanks for posting. – purefusion Aug 8 '16 at 11:27
  • disappointed might be a better fit since it simply denotes the system failed to meet his expectations, without implying his expectations were unrealistic. – james turner Aug 8 '16 at 23:33
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You feel betrayed:

  • to hurt (someone who trusts you, such as a friend or relative) by not giving help or by doing something morally wrong

  • to fail or desert especially in time of need

5

You've been burned.

burn

verb (used with object), burned or burnt, burning.

Slang. to suffer losses or be disillusioned in business or social relationships:

She was burned by that phony stock deal.

Dictionary.com — Sense 27

Has Been Burned

Meaning/Usage: To get screwed; to get a bad deal; to be tricked

Explanation: When you are burned, it hurts. When you are screwed, get a bad deal, or get cheated, that hurts too. So it became common to use "burned" in this manner.

TalkEnglish.com

Edit: I notice in your question you say:

The word I believe I'm looking for is similar to 'ized' words, in that it describes a state of 'forced distrust' assigned to myself, not the state or act of the object/person breaking the trust (e.g. "I've been/become xxxxxxxized by such-and-such...").

I would say that "I've been burned before" is more a general statement of disillusionment and distrust and doesn't imply a particular instance of "burning" (but it definitely implies that something happened).

  • This one's pretty good too, ranking just below disillusioned in my book. Thanks. – purefusion Aug 23 '16 at 16:46
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You have become jaded

Made dull, apathetic, or cynical by experience or by surfeit

  • Another one I commonly try to think of. Thank you. – purefusion Aug 23 '16 at 16:46
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Similar to disillusioned, you could say you've been disabused of its integrity:

to show or convince (someone) that a belief is incorrect (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disabuse)

Or, you could perhaps say you've been dismayed by it's poor quality:

to surprise in such a manner as to disillusion (http://www.dictionary.com/browse/dismay)

2

i would say that the bugs dispelled my confidence, disabused me of my trust, and made me wary of the system.

dispel (verb): make (a doubt, feeling, or belief) disappear.

disabuse (verb): persuade (someone) that an idea or belief is mistaken.

wary (adjective): feeling or showing caution about possible dangers or problems.

2

You've been bitten, as in 'once bitten, twice shy'. This describes your experience in the past, but also your outlook for the future.

Examples in the technology sector:

UK government gets bitten by Microsoft Word (australian news article)

Cisco bitten by Java deserialisation bug, working on patch (artice by London based IT news and reviews website)

  • I think 'disillusioned' is probably the best 'serious' word and all-rounder, but for popular or colloquial use 'burnt' or 'bitten' convey more emphasis. – simonpa71 Aug 11 '16 at 11:00

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