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I'm looking for a word that can describe an object whose sole purpose is to be fancied.

Imagine a nice decorative vase, its sole purpose is to look impressive in my room, what's a good word for this?

An example sentence would be: "The [word] vase stood in the middle of the room."

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    Why avoid using decorative ? – Gary's Student Aug 3 '16 at 21:42
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    Perhaps ornamental? – StoneyB Aug 3 '16 at 21:43
  • @Gary'sStudent decorative is a good one. In fact my favourite of all the suggestions. – teslajin Aug 3 '16 at 22:14
  • Is there some other connotation? Usually there is an additional implication, such as the thing to be fancied is also gaudy, or ostentatious, or out-of-place, etc. – Brendan Abel Aug 3 '16 at 22:16
  • @BrendanAbel no it's just a nice looking thing in the middle of a room, just so people will look at it when they walk through. – teslajin Aug 3 '16 at 22:17
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I could suggest "ornamental" (mentioned in a comment)

  • "serving as an ornament or decoration."

or "decorative" (also mentioned in comments)

  • "serving to decorate or embellish; ornamental."

but if there is no evident use for that object, not even to embellish or prettify the place where it is, then I suggest "nonfunctional", which is a more neutral adjective.

  • "lacking a practical function"
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Desirable

wished for as being an attractive, useful, or necessary course of action.

Source: Oxford Dictionary http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/desirable

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Magnificent

very good, beautiful, or deserving to be admired

Source: Cambridge Dictionary

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A word that describes something whose purpose is to be fancied depends on who fancies the object. The implications are different.

Using the example: The [word] vase stood in the middle of the room.

If the vase standing in the middle of the room was rather plain but some action was taken to make the vase fancy, a word such as decorated would apply. The decorated vase stood in the middle of the room ready for view.

If the vase standing in the middle of the room was fancied due to desirability placed upon owning a piece by the artist who created it, say, a different circumstance applies given the same wording.

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Bling

Usually I hear this as a noun e.g. lots of bling in her house , but adjective usage is okay too, e.g. The bling vase stood in the middle of the room.

Bling - adjective​ [...]  informal.
used to describe jewellery or decoration that attracts attention because it is very noticeable and looks expensive:

That gold chain is a little too bling for my taste. - http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bling

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The following works well,

Alluring

To entice by charm or attraction

(REF: Merriam-Webster)

"The alluring vase stood in the middle of the room."

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