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I would like to say the following:

"One might be tempted to assume that A. However, this is not the case."

I would like to stress that it is not only not the case, but it is not at all the case, the assumption is way too strong, it doesn't hold at all. It is in the context of mathematics.

Thanks for any suggestion.

  • 1
    ". . . that is not anywhere near the case!" Don – rhetorician Aug 2 '16 at 14:13
  • This is perfect, thanks! I didn't know that this correct English. thanks :) – user136457 Aug 2 '16 at 14:14
2

"One might be tempted to assume that A. However, this is absolutely not the case."

or,

"One might be tempted to assume that A. However, this is fundamentaly not the case."

or,

"One might be tempted to assume that A. However, this could not be further from the truth."

or,

"One might be tempted to assume that A. However, this is unequivocally not the case.

or,

"One might be tempted to assume that A. However, this is patently not the case."

0

I think such an assumption is invalid.

1.2 (Especially of an argument, statement, or theory) not true because based on erroneous information or unsound reasoning:
a comparison is invalid if we are not comparing like with like

References:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_fallacy http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/invalid#nav2

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