The following quote:

A relic cigarette never tastes the same, and that's all I'll preach about rekindling an old flame.

Can be changed into this quote:

A lighted cigarette never tastes the same, and that's all I'll preach about relighted old flames.

But what does this mean?

closed as off-topic by Dan Bron, k1eran, FumbleFingers, cobaltduck, RegDwigнt Aug 2 '16 at 12:52

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  • 4
    relic cigarette or do you mean relit ? – k1eran Aug 2 '16 at 11:15
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    Your "translation" is wrong. Did you look up "relic" in a dictionary? Did you look up "old flame" as it pertains to love? The simile the makes is quite transparent: a cigarette, when relit, never tastes the same as it did before it was originally extinguished. Same thing with loving your ex. – Dan Bron Aug 2 '16 at 11:15
  • An old flame means a former romantic or sexual partner. – Colin Fine Aug 2 '16 at 11:16
  • yes indeed it was a typo i did mean relit thanyou – PhixIT Aug 2 '16 at 12:08
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about a typo (relic = relit). – FumbleFingers Aug 2 '16 at 12:08

As a smoker I suspect that there is a typo in your sentence:

A reliT cigarette never tastes the same, and that's all I'll preach about rekindling an old flame.

Which refers to the fact that when you extinguish a cigarette and light it again afterwards, it doesn't taste the same as when you originally lit it.

The sentence tells you that rekindling an old flame, which means restarting a relationship with someone you broke up with, is like relighting a cigarette. It may seem like a good idea, but you will be disappointed because it never will be the same as it used to be.

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