2

Why does the sentence say

But I worry that I might get angry and yell

instead of

I might be angry and yell?

I think this is an example of the passive used in a sentence, but I don't understand the grammar.

5

There is no passive here. Get acts as a passive auxiliary ('helping verb') only when it is followed by a past participle.

I worry that I might get yelled at = I worry that I might be yelled at.

When it is followed by an adjective, get acts as a copula ('linking verb'), with the sense "become".

I worry that I might get angry = I worry that I might become angry.


Observe, by the way, that be exhibits the same pattern: with a past participle it is understood as a passive, with an adjective it is understood as a copula. And just like be, which sense is intended can be ambiguous with past participles that can be understood as either verbs or adjectives:

I got annoyed = I became slightly angry or Something made me slightly angry.
I was annoyed = I was slightly angry or Something made me slightly angry.

-3

The first sentence "I worry that I might get angry and yell" shows concern. It implies that the speaker is concerned and perhaps even doesn't want to get angry.

The second sentence "I might be angry and yell" shows a lack of concern, to me, it feels more like a warning. "If you keep that up I'm going to get angry and yell."

1
  • Hi Desdanovas, welcome to English Language & Usage. This site is a bit different from other Q&A sites: brief suggestions are discouraged, with preference given to a detailed answer explaining why it is correct - preferably by quoting a reference and/or linking to a source (eg a dictionary definition). For help writing a good answer, see How to Answer. – Chappo Hasn't Forgotten Monica Aug 2 '16 at 3:49

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