2

For the following sentence, I would like to find a good word for "beginning". In German, we for example have "Geburtsstunde" which means "hour of birth", and I would like to find a similar word.

"The ... problem has been thoroughly studied ever since the beginning of the studies of graph theory."

I am completely unsure how to write this sentence and it is also fine to completely change it, but I really would like it to sound "great", as it is planned to be the first sentence of the introduction in a paper.

Thank you very much for your help!

  • 2
    Here is one possibility: "The ... problem has been thoroughly studied since the origins of graph theory." You don't need to mention "studied/studies" twice. – Mark Hubbard Jul 29 '16 at 14:52
  • 2
    Since the inception of graph theory. – Lambie Jul 29 '16 at 15:04
  • There's also "outset". For something a bit more poetic, perhaps "dawn". – Doug Warren Jul 29 '16 at 21:11
  • @MarkHubbard depending on the problem user136457 has in mind and their opinion on history, graph theory might be considered to have a singular "origin". – Mark S. Jul 30 '16 at 1:03
  • @MarkS. Good point. It looks like "inception" won the day. I assume graph theory didn't spring into existence at a fixed point in time, but my knowledge of the history of mathematics is embarrassingly limited. Thank you for your comments, both here and below. – Mark Hubbard Jul 30 '16 at 13:46
10

How about inception?

beginning; start; commencement.

Dictionary.com

For example:

"The ... problem has been thoroughly studied ever since the inception of graph theory."

  • 1
    Graph theory isn't really an event in the relevant sense; "inception" sounds odd to me (as would "start" or "beginning"). – Mark S. Jul 30 '16 at 1:00
4

The simple translation to birth (no hour) would do quite well.

Merriam-Webster on-line includes two relevant grandiose examples of this usage:

“the birth of the solar system ”

“We are witnessing the birth of a new era.”

As for the translation, I would omit the “studies” and write:

The ... problem has been thoroughly studied since the birth of graph theory.

Less is more.

  • I do like "birth". It resonates with the German word. I also agree with dropping "the studies". The German word "Gerburdsstunde" is very apt. – Peter Bear Jul 30 '16 at 8:16
4

I think genesis would work well.

: the origin or coming into being of something <the genesis of a new political movement> [MW}

Or perhaps emergence:

: the act of becoming known or coming into view [MW]

1

I'd simply use dawn:

"The ... problem has been thoroughly studied ever since the dawn of graph theory."

-1

I would say

Perennial

works well here.

Lasting or existing for a long or apparently infinite time; enduring or continually recurring.

Ref: Oxford

"The perennial problem has been thoroughly studied ever since the beginning of the studies of graph theory."

Edit: Just to add, this word is often used in this context.

See for example here:

"The perennial urban problems of drugs and homelessness"

Which is an example taken from a dictionary defining the word.

  • 1
    The connotation of 'continually recurring' is too strong I fear. – Pureferret Jul 29 '16 at 16:16
  • Gandalf. The op is not simply looking for a synonym for beginning. "In German, we for example have "Geburtsstunde" which means "hour of birth", and I would like to find a similar word." Perennial can be used to mean 'for an apparently infinite time', hence close proximity in meaning to from 'hour of birth', from an individual subjects perspective. The word needs to fit this sentence "The ... problem has been thoroughly studied ever since the beginning of the studies of graph theory." in which case only an adjective will do. Unless I have misunderstood the question, which is entirely possible. – Gary Jul 30 '16 at 8:25
  • 1
    This answer does not answer the question. The OP is not asking for a replacement for the "..." in the sentence. The OP is asking for a replacement for the word "beginning" in the sentence. – MetaEd Aug 1 '16 at 18:37

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