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Can anybody think of a word meaning infinite that isn't a combination of a negative prefix or suffix and a word meaning some sort of bound, such as limitless, endless, or unlimited? I haven't been able to think of any yet and I'm wondering if this carries some lexo-philosophical implications with how we consider the infinite with respect to language. And if there aren't any words like this in English, are there in other languages? And if so, does it affect their consideration of the infinite.

migrated from meta.english.stackexchange.com Jul 29 '16 at 6:47

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    Comments didn't survive migration, but this would be improved by including definite references to research in a thesaurus (for infinite). There are a few non-negated examples, but not many. – Andrew Leach Jul 29 '16 at 6:52
  • Interesting, but it is probably a question for the Linguistic site. – user66974 Jul 29 '16 at 6:53
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    "eternal", "perpetual", "everlasting", and perhaps others from the thesaurus thesaurus.com/browse/infinite – Max Williams Jul 29 '16 at 7:22
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    @Josh61 or philosophy.stackexchange.com – Mitch Jul 29 '16 at 13:18
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May be, "all-encompassing", "all- embracing", supreme, omnipresnt.

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