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"Another pattern, that regularly appears, is a Not Found response that queries the database...".

I think this is incorrect but I'm not sure.

I think the correct version should be:

"Another pattern that regularly appears is a Not Found response that queries the database"

However, what rule is coming into place here? I originally said it was because "that regularly appears" was a restrictive appositive, but I don't think that's right now.

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    that regularly appears is a restrictive relative clause, i.e., it defines the pattern you're talking about. It's not an appositive, which is a renaming construct. Restrictive modifiers are generally not set off by commas. A non-restrictive clause -- Another pattern, which sometimes appears unexpectedly, .... -- would be set off by commas. – deadrat Jul 26 '16 at 17:03
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    "Another pattern, that regularly appears, ....' is awkward at best. Far better would be "Another pattern, and one that appears regularly, ...'. The restrictive relative clause can be paraphrased "Another regularly appearing pattern ..." – Edwin Ashworth Aug 6 '16 at 22:31
  • Fashions in comma use have changed considerably since the late 1700s. Consider the opening sentence of The Tory Act (Jan. 2, 1776): "WHEREAS it has been represented to this Congress, that divers honest and well meaning, but uninformed people in these colonies, have by the art and address of ministerial agents, been deceived and drawn into erroneous opinion, respecting the American cause, and the probable issue of the present contest." The comma between words 8 and 9 ("Congress" and "that") is typical of the punctuation style of the time. – Sven Yargs Jan 22 '17 at 18:08
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Personally, if you wanted to keep your phrasing the same, I'd go for:

Another pattern that regularly appears, is a Not Found response that queries the database...

However, as previous commenters have said, another pattern that regularly appears is a bit awkward, try:

Another regularly appearing pattern

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