7

I know that when a word is capitalized it expresses yelling.

What about text showing someone is talking and emphasizing a particular word, but he clearly isn't yelling the word out?

How is a "non-yelling" emphasis shown in text?

  • 6
    Maybe you try italics or bolding – Jim Jul 24 '16 at 17:37
11

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_(linguistics)#Prosodic_stress

I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else did.)

I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did not take it.)

I didn't take the test yesterday. (I did something else with it.)

I didn't take the test yesterday. (I took a different one.)

I didn't take the test yesterday. (I took something else.)

I didn't take the test yesterday. (I took it some other day.)

As in the examples above, stress is normally transcribed as italics in printed text or underlining in handwriting.

  • And as caps in media which don't support italics or underlining. – StoneyB Jul 24 '16 at 18:54
  • 3
    @StoneyB I would prefer * asterisks * if there is no support for italics or underlining. Also, how would * you * put emphasis on the first word of the sentence, 'I'? – We oath to creation Jul 24 '16 at 19:01
  • 3
    Me, I like asterisks, too. – StoneyB Jul 24 '16 at 19:04

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