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Apparently over the last decades the standard reply to "How are you?" has become:

"I'm good."

I am not a native speaker but it still sounds bad to me. What is your reaction to that, is it more AE than BE, is it in your opinion colloquial, slang, just sloppy English like ..ain't or it has gained a standard status with a slightly different meaning?

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  • The formal non-sloppy version would be "I'm well (thank you)".
    – Law29
    Jul 22 '16 at 7:14
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    It is colloquial. If you're going to complain about it you'd have to complain about "goodbye" and many other now-accepted colloquialisms.
    – Hot Licks
    Jul 22 '16 at 12:30
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    and if you want even more of a headache, "I'm good" can also mean "no thanks" :D
    – user180089
    Jul 22 '16 at 20:53
  • Related: I am ok for it - what does it mean?
    – Davo
    Feb 19 '19 at 20:23
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According to the OED, this usage is a an American English colloquialism, though apparently one common enough to deserve an entry under good. The online version gives definition C.1.a

good: adv, In a satisfactory, adequate, or effective manner; well. Now chiefly N. Amer. colloq.

So I would answer "yes" to all of your questions: it is slang, it is a colloquialism, it is especially common in American English, it is sloppy grammar, and it is generally accepted, at least in spoken English.

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    and if you want even more of a headache, "I'm good" can also mean "no thanks" :D
    – user180089
    Jul 22 '16 at 20:54
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As a native British English speaker I have found myself increasingly replying "I'm good" to "How are you?" in recent years.

When I first heard it, my instinct was the same as yours - both that it sounded American, and also wrong. It seemed as if it should be an answer to a question such as: "Are you good or evil?". Answer: "I'm good!"

Now it seems more and more accepted to just mean the same as "I'm fine, thank you".

I guess that it is a generational thing, though. So you would have to be careful using it with anyone over the age of fifty.

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    Ahem! I've been known to use it myself, even at the advanced age of 52 and 4 6ths ;-)
    – Spagirl
    Jul 22 '16 at 10:19
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    and if you want even more of a headache, "I'm good" can also mean "no thanks" :D
    – user180089
    Jul 22 '16 at 20:54