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One of my friend told me that i often make this kind of mistake in my writing, that is having 2 subjects in one sentece. What troubles me is it sounds perfectly fine to me and it could be that i've been wrong all along. Could you guys tell me where i'm wrong and how to fix it?. For example, i was writing about some restaurants, and he told me that it and their Their signature- Lime drink shouldn't be in a same sentence.

"Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible, it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal".

or in this sentence he said If you ever visit Lime Restaurant and it shoudn't be in a same sentence.

"If you ever visit Lime Restaurant, be sure to check out their Foie Gras, it is known to often dissolve in one’s mouth and leave a unique sensation on the taste buds, or the Kam Heong Crab that imbued skillfully with necessary fragrances to truly bring out its character".

To me If you ever visit Lime Restaurant was a introductory element and had nothing to do with it. Am i wrong?

Thank you guys ^^.

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  • This type of Q. would be more appropriate on English Language Learners. Please also note that "I" (as in "I am", I've", etc.) is written as a capital letter in English.
    – TrevorD
    Jul 19, 2016 at 11:58
  • The issue isn't that you've got Is having two subjects in one sentence. Most people would say you've got two sentences in both your examples. So they should be separated by a period, not a comma. Jul 19, 2016 at 12:20

2 Answers 2

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I would say it would be correct with different punctuation:

"Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible; it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal".

or

"Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible - it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal".

With just a comma I would say it is incorrect. Your friend probably also does not mean two subjects. You can definitely have two subjects in a sentence, such as "Mom and Dad cook" used in this worksheet for teachers: https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/diagramming-sentences/diagram-sentences-two-subjects_TWOSU.pdf. Your friend is probably talking about clauses.

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Yes, it's a very common mistake, even among native speakers.

What you're doing is called a comma splice:

A comma splice is the use of a comma to join two independent clauses. For example:

It is nearly half past five, we cannot reach town before dark.

You either need to separate them into two individual sentences, or you need to connect them into a single sentence.

Simply removing the comma does not correct the error, but results in a run-on sentence (if not already one). There are several ways to correct a comma splice:

  • Change the comma to a semicolon, em dash, or colon:

    • It is nearly half past five; we cannot reach town before dark.
    • It is nearly half past five—we cannot reach town before dark.
    • We cannot reach town before dark: it is nearly half past five.
  • Write the two clauses as two separate sentences:

    • It is nearly half past five. We cannot reach town before dark.
  • Insert a coordinating conjunction following the comma:

    • It is nearly half past five, so we cannot reach town before dark.
    • It is nearly half past five, and we cannot reach town before dark.
  • Make one clause dependent on the other:

    • Because it is nearly half past five, we cannot reach town before dark.
    • It is nearly half past five, which means we cannot reach town before dark.
  • Use a semicolon plus a conjunctive adverb:

    • It is nearly half past five; hence we cannot reach town before dark.

So your example:

Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible, it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal.

Becomes:

Their signature lime drink is also incredible. It is refreshing and healthy. It indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal.

That's just one approach, and you might want to change it to fit the style you're going for.

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