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I am a non-native English language speaker.
I have been using curated as the word to describe something that has been selected from a larger set. Today when I was writing an article, I looked up the word and it doesn't look like it is used a lot.

What alternatives I can use? For example, I'd like to using a word similar to curate in the following sentence:

Please select the best applications from all the ones that we've got.

Additional info from OP in comment:
The sentence is meant to be used on the internet as well as in general speaking. I meant to say select a subset from a larger set, maybe after careful examination. For eg, let's say there is a news app that shows me every news. But I only want to see specific news stories and not everything. So I would want the news app to the news stories before showing to me. Hope this clarifies.

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    I can't recall ever having heard curated used in that way in my 60+ years as a British English speaker. – TrevorD Jul 16 '16 at 18:12
  • @TrevorD I am from India, so we use British English too. What would you use then? – mahacoder Jul 16 '16 at 18:14
  • Please clarify what types of 'applications', 'collections', etc. you are referring to: computer programs (which is what I first thought of when reading "applications"); art; clothing; ... . In a comment below, you mention 'news stories' - what type of news? Where is your sentence to be used: in a journal; on the internet; ...? – TrevorD Jul 16 '16 at 18:26
  • @TrevorD The sentence is meant to be used on the internet as well as in general speaking. I meant to say select a subset from a larger set, maybe after careful examination. For eg, let's say there is a news app that shows me every news. But I only want to see specific news stories and not everything. So I would want the news app to <fill in the word here> the news stories before showing to me. Hope this clarifies. – mahacoder Jul 16 '16 at 19:08
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Two dictionaries define the use of curate as a verb as follows:

curate Cambridge Dictionary:
verb [transitive]

  • to be in charge of selecting and caring for objects to be shown in a museum or to form part of a collection of art, an exhibition, etc.:
    She curated a recent exhibition of Indian artwork.
  • to be in charge of selecting films, performers, events, etc. to be included in a festival:
    a Messiaen festival curated by pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard
  • to select things such as documents, music, products, or internet content to be included as part of a list or collection, or on a website:
    a curated library of short movies available online

curate Oxford Dictionary:
verb [with object]

  • Select, organize, and look after the items in (a collection or exhibition):
    both exhibitions are curated by the Centre’s director
    He has had ten years of museum experience curating exhibitions, commissioning new works, and developing artist residency programs.
    Plus, I am really excited to be guest curating a large exhibition from the museum's wonderful American Folk Art Collection.
    Over the past decade, my father has been slowly curating a collection of AIDS posters from all over the world, for the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda.

  • Select the performers or performances that will feature in (an arts event or programme):
    in past years the festival has been curated by the likes of David Bowie
    The Observer is media partner of this year's Meltdown festival, which is curated by Patti Smith.
    It's a great insane ending to a brilliantly curated day of music.
    The concert is part of this Meltdown Festival curated by Morrissey.

  • Select, organize, and present (online content, merchandise, information, etc.), typically using professional or expert knowledge:
    people not only want to connect when using a network but they also enjoy getting credit for sharing or curating information.
    (as adjective curated) a curated alternative to the world’s most popular video portal
    It's a curated platform with 225,000 apps.
    Mr Hirschorn said that people not only want to connect when using a network but they also enjoy getting credit for sharing or curating information.
    It appears that consumers like the integrated, curated systems and platforms that Apple has created.

Personally, I've only previously come across the use of curated in connection with art or historical artifacts (e.g. in a museum), but it's clear that it can be used in connection with lists or collections on the internet.

It's also clear, however, that it's only used in connection with collections of items that have been individually selected — one might have said 'hand-picked' in older terminology — "typically using professional or expert knowledge" (see third definition from Oxford Dictionary, above).

This is confirmed by the definition of curator:

curator Oxford Dictionary
noun

  • keeper or custodian of a museum or other collection:
    the curator of drawings at the National Gallery

  • person who selects acts to perform at a music festival. Next month, as curator of the Meltdown festival, she will play it in its entirety on stage for the first time.

Op's example sentence (in which the use of 'curated' is being considered) is:

Please select the best applications from all the ones that we've got.

I'm not clear exactly what items are intended to be referred to, nor exactly what meaning is intended to be conveyed, but, as it currently reads, that sentence means:

Please choose whichever applications you think are the best from our entire collection.

Although I may have misunderstood the intent, that sentence reads to me as if the customer is doing the choosing of what he/she thinks are "the best" items, from the entire collection available. On the other hand, a 'curated collection' should have already pre-selected only the best items, and not be offering "all the ones that we've got".

If the desired meaning does accord with my last sentence above, then I have the following suggestions:

Please make your choices from our carefully pre-selected [items]
Please make your selection from our expertly chosen collection of ...

Addendum

OP's additional clarification gives the following example:

Let's say there is a news app that shows me [all] news. But I only want to see specific news stories and not everything. So I would want the news app to ... [fill in the word here] ... the news stories before showing [them] to me.

First, on my understanding from the definitions and examples above, curation can only be done by a person: not by a machine.
Secondly, there is no specification of the criteria to be used by the app to select the appropriate ones to display; but (from the mention of "specific news stories") I assume the choice is based solely on the subject matter / content of the stories.
That is clearly not curation because it is not "using professional or expert knowledge" or any other careful selection by a person.

Without further information, the choice sounds merely as if it is categorisation or content choice. You could refer to the app "filtering the news stories by content/subject".

  • I appreciate your patience in taking the time to write a good answer. Yes, it looks like the news app example could use the word filtering. Thank you. – mahacoder Jul 17 '16 at 8:37
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Although not used often in conversation, I think curated is perfectly fine in your sentence.

please choose the best applications from our curated selection

An alternative

please select the best applications from our array of choices

Another

please select the best applications from our choice selection

  • can I use it in the the following sentence, "I would like to see a curated set of news stories, not all of them"? – mahacoder Jul 16 '16 at 18:12
  • @ak31 it sounds fine to me. – Drai Jul 16 '16 at 20:01
  • On the basis of the definitions of "curate" mentioned in my answer, that would mean something akin to 'hand-picked' news stories. – TrevorD Jul 16 '16 at 20:25
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"curate" implies that the selection process is based on personal tastes / feelings AND that the items are from different sources.

"shortlist" implies that the selection process is based on a defined set of criteria to be applied to an existing set of items / collection.

a more common term used in recent years (especially in online shopping sites / news sites) is "filter" where you eliminate items that don't fit your chosen criteria. The use of this term implies that the items are pre-categorised, tagged, or have keywords attached to them in order for the filtering process to work.

in the example of news feed / online shop / etc, you either set the filters after you've been presented with the full list, or you can pre-set the filters before you do a search

Each word broadly means the same thing, but very subtly mean different things to different people ... at the end of the day, it depends on your audience - the beauty of language is the ability to fine-tune your use of word to very specific audience/meaning

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Your example sentence:

please select the best applications from all the ones that we've got.

Suggested:

Please shortlist the best applications that we've got.

protected by Community Mar 25 at 23:14

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