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I have an older version of a product named Foo Classic (where Foo is replaced with an actual proper name).

Would it sound/look weird if I rename it to Classic Foo, especially for a native speaker?

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    Maybe, but only slightly, because we're so used to the Foo Classic-type wording from brands. Some marketing person must have determined a long time ago that it's best to write the brand name first, before "Classic" or any other qualifier, even though in normal written English (absent marketing influences) it would definitely be described as "Classic Foo". Jul 11, 2016 at 18:11
  • Thanks for your comment, Nick. I'd happily accept it as an answer if you turn it into one. Jul 11, 2016 at 18:21
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    You can name a product anything you want. Could be Archetypal Foo if you wish. Probably Hackneyed Foo would be a poor choice, though.
    – Hot Licks
    Jul 11, 2016 at 18:30
  • Altho' - as @HotLicks says - you can, in theory, "name a product anything you want", you also need to be aware of Trade Mark (TM) laws. If there's a TM for "Foo Classic", the alternative "Classic Foo" might still be deemed to be an infringement of the TM - depending on national law & lots of other issues.
    – TrevorD
    Jul 11, 2016 at 18:38
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    TrevorD, I sell both Foo and Foo Classic, and would like to rename the latter. Jul 11, 2016 at 18:52

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Classic Foo might sound awkward, but only slightly, because we're so used to the Foo Classic-type wording from brands. (It also depends on your target audience -- see my "P.S." at the bottom of this answer.)

(Off the top of my head, I'm thinking about Coca-Cola Classic, Pepsi Next, and Mountain Dew: Code Red, all of which have the brand name followed by the adjective... I must have soft drinks on my mind.)

Some marketing person must have determined a long time ago that it's best to write the brand name first, before "Classic" or any other moodifier; this way you hear or read the brand name before anything else. This style of writing brand names has become so familiar that it sounds normal, even though in normal written English (absent marketing influences) the adjective would come first (it would be described as Classic Foo or Code Red Mountain Dew or Next Pepsi).

P.S.: I'm saying this as a native American English speaker who loves reading books but can't help but be immersed in the commercial culture of my country. This is my opinion, and other people might disagree. Your choice also might depend on your target market: if your customers are literary, educational, conservative, or upper-class types, maybe they'd prefer the slightly more formal-sounding Classic Foo over Foo Classic.

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