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State-wide is the best I can come up with, but I think National has more significance that simply nation-wide, e.g. a National Treasure.

Planning restrictions were eased for the new building as it was deemed to have _____ significance

The blank space relates to its significance to a State. State-wide could be used, but doesn't sound quite right

I want to say "Statial" but that has a different meaning.

  • Have you tried to Google "state treasure", "state senator" or "state legislature", etc? Can you write an example sentence where the word or phrase would be used? – user140086 Jul 10 '16 at 9:03
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    @Rathony "planning restrictions were eased for the new building as it was deemed to have <something> significance" - where <something> relates to it's significance to a State. State-wide could be used, but doesn't sound quite right. – aaa90210 Jul 10 '16 at 9:09
  • Please edit your question by clicking on edit. – user140086 Jul 10 '16 at 9:13
  • @Rathony that is not necessary as I am not looking for help completing/rewriting a sentence but for an equivalent word. – aaa90210 Jul 10 '16 at 9:18
  • That is very important because you need to show us in what context the word would be used. The following is the strict rule of this community. Questions on choosing an ideal word or phrase must include information on how it will be used in order to be answered. For help writing a good word or phrase request, see: About single word requests. You need to add the tag "single-word-request", too. – user140086 Jul 10 '16 at 9:20
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In the United States, at least, the standard noun/adjective correspondence is nation/national ~ state/state, as Edwin Ashworth suggests in a comment above.

That correspondence may not look terribly appealing, but you can demonstrate to yourself that it is accurate as applied to most situations by considering such pairs as "national elections/state elections," "a national bank/a state bank," and "a national problem/a state problem."

In the OP's example, saying that a building "was deemed to have state significance" is exactly how that idea would be expressed (in passive voice) in a typical U.S. newspaper's account of the decision. In my view, none of the other options—statal, statial, or statewide—suggested above suits the context of the situation particularly well. You could argue, however, that statewide is more suitable if the main point you're trying to make is that the building has significance to people across the state, whereas state is more suitable if your main point is that the building has significance to the state taken as a collective entity.

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