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This question already has an answer here:

chivalrous

Chivalrous is an adjective that is generally used for men. Is there an adjective that can be used to describe women in a similar fashion?

marked as duplicate by Kevin Workman, user140086, MetaEd, NVZ, Mari-Lou A Jul 8 '16 at 11:55

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Being chivalrous only applied to men, because only men were able to become knighted. However, that does not mean a woman could not follow the Knights Code.

There's no reason why a woman can't be chivalrous.

Despite popular belief, in the Knights Code of Chivalry, gender is only really mentioned once. Most of it has to do with being honorable, helping the weak, and being merciful:

  • To fear God and maintain His Church
  • To serve the liege lord in valour and faith
  • To protect the weak and defenceless
  • To give succour to widows and orphans
  • To refrain from the wanton giving of offence
  • To live by honour and for glory
  • To despise pecuniary reward
  • To fight for the welfare of all
  • To obey those placed in authority
  • To guard the honour of fellow knights
  • To eschew unfairness, meanness and deceit
  • To keep faith
  • At all times to speak the truth
  • To persevere to the end in any enterprise begun
  • To respect the honour of women
  • Never to refuse a challenge from an equal
  • Never to turn the back upon a foe
  • It would be better to say usually, rather than only and you might improve your point by making mention of female knights like The Order of the Blessed Virgin Mary or Joan of Arc. Also, it might be better to call it by the Charlamange Code of Chivalry in part because the specifics may vary regionally, but more importantly so that if that link ever becomes inaccessible, to make it easier for people to verify the data presented. If granted permission, I would like to make some edits to this post to that effect. – Tonepoet Jul 7 '16 at 18:22

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