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What should I do to let a reader know that in a quote the ellipses aren't mine and have been placed by the original author? This is the quote:

My home university did a study of its alumni a few years back, and they discovered that out of all the various degree subjects, the one that led to the highest average income was ... mathematics. (Stewart, Letters, 1)

  • @SvenYargs while those are somewhat helpful they don't quite get the context of what I'm saying. – tox123 Jul 2 '16 at 23:16
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If you replace words with an ellipsis, the convention is to put it in square brackets:

What should I do to let a reader know that in a quote the ellipses aren't mine [...]

That makes it clear that you added it yourself and that it wasn't in the original.

If that convention isn't explicit enough for your particular case, you could add a comment in square brackets to make it clear:

Hodor Hodor Hodor ...

[ellipsis in original]

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    the convention is to put it in square brackets Whose convention is this? – deadrat Jul 1 '16 at 6:01
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    This answer was automatically flagged as low-quality because of its length and content. A good answer is comprehensive and contains an explanation of why it is correct. Links to external resources are encouraged. For help writing a good answer, see How to Answer. – MetaEd Jul 1 '16 at 16:00
  • @deadrat The Modern Language Association (MLA) style handbook (such as the 6th edition) used to require that ellipses not appearing in the original text be placed in square brackets. I believe (but am not positive) that they removed that requirement in more recent editions. Other stylebooks such as APA and Chicago never had that requirement. – Nick Weinberg Jul 2 '16 at 1:56

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