2

What is the English term that one uses to indicate "the culture one is born in"?

  • 2
    The nation one is born in is one's nationality. The culture? Not sure. One's native culture, I suppose. – Dan Bron Jun 10 '16 at 17:18
  • 1
    E.g. "I'm from Japan, but I have lived in the US since I was two years old."? I suppose then you were born in a Japanese culture but you then assimilated the values and customs of the US. I think you need to add more context, your question is not very clear to me. – Mari-Lou A Jun 10 '16 at 17:23
  • 2
    Native culture or birth culture (the latter only if there is a later culture to refer to). – John Lawler Jun 10 '16 at 19:34
  • @Mari-LouA As per that example, for you, English is a (adopted/acquired/second/native?) language? – NVZ Jun 11 '16 at 12:27
2

The word 'native' is used to describe anything that applies to you at the time of your birth. So the culture you were born in would be your 'native culture'.

People sometimes use 'native' to mean 'the main thing' (as in "since I came to England, English has become my native language") but this is wrong.

| improve this answer | |
  • But what if you're German born, but adopted and raised in England since age 1? Wouldn't English be more native to you? – NVZ Jun 11 '16 at 6:03
  • No, that's my point. Strictly German is your native culture. – DJClayworth Jun 11 '16 at 12:12
2

This blog entry has “birth culture” as its title and then once again near the end to describe the culture of the author’s birth. “Cultural roots” is also used with that meaning near the article's top.
(from Beyond Two Worlds: Musings of a Taiwanese-American Adoptee)

As long as it’s clear that you’re talking/writing about some person’s “native culture” then there would be little chance for ambiguity, but “native culture/s” can also mean [a country’s] “indigenous culture/s,” i.e., the culture of its indigenous/native inhabitants. (Just as, to be fair, “birth culture” should be used with an appropriate personal possessive pronoun to avoid confusion with other meanings of that term, so maybe "cultural roots" would be less prone to confusion)

| improve this answer | |
2

Heritage-

a heritage of poverty and suffering; a national heritage of honor, pride, andcourage.

| improve this answer | |
1

It's not exactly what you're looking for, but how about 'milieu':

A person’s social environment:

he grew up in a military milieu

Another definition

surroundings, especially of a social or cultural nature

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.