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What is the best way to say this?

Because of yours and the John Wichel Foundation’s grant we are able to continue our mission to serve all Texans with diabetes.

Should it be

Because of your and John Wichel Foundation's grant, we are able . . . OR
Because of yours and the John Wichel Foundation's grant, we are able . . .

It's a double possessive with the word your. No matter how I write it, it doesn't sound right.

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When using them separately, we'd use-

  • Your grant...
  • John Wichel Foundation's grant...

When using them together, combining them with an 'and'-

...your and John Wichel Foundation's grants...

... which, when placed into the context of this sentence, would be- "Because of your and the John Wichel Foundation’s grants, we are able to continue our mission to serve all Texans with diabetes."

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    I think this is a good answer, but do you think the pluaralization on "grant" is grammatically necessary? I think it helps facilitate the (likely) intended meaning, but the same meaning is accessible by dropping the plural. – GoldenGremlin Jun 8 '16 at 19:43
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    @Silenus If they made more than one grant, pluralize grant. If they made one grant, it remains singular—no s. – Stan Jun 8 '16 at 19:51
  • @Stan, fair enough. I guess I was wondering about the grammaticality of sentences like: "Your and my dog play great together." This sounds fine to me despite the fact that 'dog' is not plural. There is an elided 'dog' after 'your.' The same could happen with 'grant'. – GoldenGremlin Jun 8 '16 at 19:53
  • @Silenus "Your dog and mine play great together," might be easier on the ear. – Stan Jun 8 '16 at 19:57
  • Thank you guys! I had no idea my post was answered! – Rlativity1 Jul 27 '16 at 16:28

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