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I received an email from a client. On her signature, her job title was shown as Client Liasor.

I have seen that title listed as Client liaison, or even (perhaps more accurately as well) Client Liaison Manager, but never have I seen it listed as this.

Interestingly enough, I can't find the word liasor in any of the dictionaries I have laying around, but it seems to be readily used online.

Should her job title be listed as Client Liaison or Client Liasor?

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    It's liaison with two i. Is it possible that an n was mistaken to be an r? – NVZ Jun 6 '16 at 10:07
  • Ah wow. That's embarrassing. Thanks, I've fixed it up :) – Frits Jun 6 '16 at 10:08
  • Her job title should be listed as whatever her employer wants it to be listed as. – Scott Jun 6 '16 at 10:23
  • Nowadays it's all "Digital Eagle" and "Web Prophet". Job titles don't appear to follow any rules. – Max Williams Jun 6 '16 at 10:42
  • Related (?): What does "web-mistress" imply as a job title? – Scott Jun 6 '16 at 11:24
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The internet says (or doesn't say) liaison is probably correct, but one could argue that the coinage "liaisor" stems from the verb "liaise" and could be used as "someone who liaises".

LiaiseODO

verb

  1. Cooperate on a matter of mutual concern
    "she will liaise with teachers across the country"
    1.1 (liaise between) Act as a link to assist communication between (people or groups)
    "civil servants who liaise between the prime minister and departmental ministers"

Origin: 1920s (originally military slang): back-formation from liaison.

I'd be interested in reading your client's answer if you ask her about the usage.

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