0

When offering a list of examples, I've seen it done 4 different ways:

  • (e.g., x, y, and z)
  • (e.g., x, y, z)
  • (x, y, and z)
  • (x, y, z)

Which of these is correct? Are they all okay to use?

Example used as a sentence:

  • Our website offers links to various resources across campus (e.g.,student services, campus housing, and parking services).
  • Our website offers links to various resources across campus (e.g.,student services, campus housing, parking services).
  • Our website offers links to various resources across campus (student services, campus housing, and parking services).
  • Our website offers links to various resources across campus (student services, campus housing, parking services).
  • All but the last seem fine to me. – Blubberguy22 Jun 3 '16 at 18:06
1

I have two comments.

  1. There is no need for a comma after 'e.g.' (in i and I), but there is a need for a space.

  2. I don't like the 'and' in the list as it seems to finalize something that is only an example, but leaving it out seems ungrammatical. I would suggest a fifth option that overcomes this:

(x, y, z etc.)

This also seems to me better for a website, going straight into the list instead of starting with 'e.g.'

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.