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Vishal invested 2/11 th part of his monthly income in stocks share and that of 4/11th part in mutual fund

This is a mathematical question (source).

I am confused about the usage of 'that of'

Does this mean, that he invested 2/11 of his monthly income in stocks share and 4/11 of his monthly income in mutual fund?

or

he invested 2/11 of his monthly income in stocks share and 4/11 of his remaining income in mutual fund?

closed as unclear what you're asking by TrevorD, user140086, GoldenGremlin, Drew, tchrist May 24 '16 at 3:18

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    OP appears not to have copied the original quote correctly. The source appears to have been written in Indian English (or similar) - and is grossly ambiguous. IMHO, any interpretation would be pure guesswork, and the Q is therefore inappropriate for this site. – TrevorD May 23 '16 at 23:24
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The way I would read it is as the following:

The fraction of Vishal's monthly income that he invested in stocks was 2/11, and the fraction he invested in mutual funds was 4/11.

If the author prefers to include "that of," perhaps he'd word it like this:

The fraction of Vishal's monthly income that he invested in stocks was 2/11, and that of mutual funds was 4/11.

The word "that" in the phrase is referring to the subject, such as when the author asked this question (8):

The ratio of investment of A and B is 7 : 8 and that of B and C is 4 : 9.

The subject of the sentence is "ratio of investment," so it reads, "and [the ratio of investment of] B and C is 4:9." The subject in the question you're asking about, however, is Vishal, hence the confusion.

Another possibility is that "that" is referring to the 2/11th part. This is more complex, which is why I don't think it's the intended meaning, but it could have the following meaning:

Vishal invested 2/11th part of his monthly income in stocks, and even the money for that investment he had taken out of 4/11 part of his mutual fund investments.

If you drill down on what sort of real actions Vishal would be taking, in this case, it becomes a strain to follow logically, such that Vishal is funding his investments in stocks with a fraction of his mutual fund investments, so he's selling some of those, apparently, yet his stock purchases are said to be coming out of his monthly income. Is this a contradiction, or is his monthly income coming from his mutual fund investments? Argh!

To make a short story long, I'd go with the first reading.

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