At last, Lady Evenstar, fairest in this world, and most beloved, my world is fading. Lo! we have gathered, and we have spent, and now the time of payment draws near.

The word spend in contrast of payment throws me off. How can you (be expected to) pay for something you already spent? What does this has to do with gathering? It's rather confusing to me.

  • I'll be happy to answer that, but first I need to borrow $100. – Elliott Frisch May 20 '16 at 0:40
  • If you mean there is some sort of loan here, that in the (greater) context of the book makes no sense? – chx May 20 '16 at 0:56
  • The "payment" is (probably) for the "loan" called life. When the life is spent, the payment is due (to Charon, or whatever other metaphor you pick). – Elliott Frisch May 20 '16 at 0:59
  • We have received what life offered; we have spent what we received on enjoying life; now we must pay for what we received. – StoneyB May 20 '16 at 1:06
  • @StoneyB this should be an answer, shouldn't it? – chx May 20 '16 at 1:23
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Copying @StoneyB 's comment into an answer:

We have received what life offered; we have spent what we received on enjoying life; now we must pay for what we received.

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