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I were recently told that the sentence "I hope that you will prove them wrong" should have two or more meanings 'in-sentence', but not how and this is bugging me!

I can only make sense of this 'out-of-sentence', by making demands to the previous sentence, either making "that" point to a previous statement "I hope that! You will prove them wrong" or by making the action "you will" point to a previous statement "I hope that you will! Prove them wrong"

(The multiple meaning could also be from dual meanings of words too, like bat->animal and baseballbat. I don't see how this would apply though)

Can you see more ways of interpreting this sentence?

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    I don't know what "In sentence" means but I can only see one meaning as well. You could put emphasis in differerent places to shift the meaning slightly, I suppose: "I hope that you will prove them wrong" or "I hope that you will prove them wrong" both express some doubt that you will prove them wrong. "I hope that you will prove them wrong" means "If they are proved wrong, I hope that you, rather than anyone else, are the one to do it." – Max Williams May 19 '16 at 8:35
  • By 'in-sentence' I mean, that the sentence should not rely on a previous sentence and the way the sentence is written should not be changed. If nothing else is submitted within the next day, I'll accept @MaxWilliams comment as an answer (If you would write it as an answer, Max?). – Andreas Gravgaard Andersen May 19 '16 at 12:15
  • Expanded into an answer. – Max Williams May 19 '16 at 12:18
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I can only see one meaning as well.

You could put emphasis in different places to shift the meaning slightly, I suppose:

"I hope that you will prove them wrong" or "I hope that you will prove them wrong" both express some doubt that you will prove them wrong.

*"I hope that you will prove them wrong" means "If they are proved wrong, I hope that you, rather than anyone else, are the one to do it."

*"I hope that you will prove them wrong" means "When you prove they're wrong or right, I hope they are wrong"

I don't know if these count, as they depend where the emphasis goes, which can only really happen when the sentence is spoken (or you use bold/italics like above).

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The word wrong can be an adverb as well as an adjective. So it could mean:

I hope that you will prove them incorrectly.

Of course, with this change, the referent for them needs to change from people to things you prove (like theorems).

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