0

My niece and nephew are joining us on holiday. Do I say You will need to arrange 'a flight' or 'flights' for yourself and James to arrive on Saturday morning, the 16th? This is assuming they will be travelling together on the same 'flight'.

9
  • @Josh61 I apologise Josh for deleting your comment. I set up two questions by mistake when trying to edit using my new phone. (I'm not the greatest technical wizard, as you may have gathered). But I take on board your suggestion that where two are travelling together it should be a flight.
    – WS2
    May 17 '16 at 7:56
  • 1
    They need to arrange a flight if they are traveling on the same airplane at the same time. If the flight is cancelled, for instance, they'll say "our flight has been cancelled" not "our flights".
    – user66974
    May 17 '16 at 7:57
  • @Josh61 But if it is not quite that clear and it is something like Arrangements have changed, you will now need to arrange "flights"/"a flight" for yourselves on Sunday. I guess the issue here is the degree of understanding that you have that the two will be travelling together. The problem is when there is any element of uncertainty about that.
    – WS2
    May 17 '16 at 8:02
  • 1
    If the context is not clear and they may have to take more than one flight, the plural form would make more sense.
    – user66974
    May 17 '16 at 8:04
  • 1
    That's how I'd read it. The fact that their "flights" may actually result in them travelling on the same plane at the same time may be considered a (fortunate or unfortunate, depending on their relationship) coincidence. May 17 '16 at 8:10
1

Normally I would expect that if you have multiple flights in mind (i.e. potentially separate for each person), you would say "flights", but if you expect they only need one flight, you would say "a flight".

However, since in this context the word "flight" is shorthand for "a flight booking" or "an airplane ride ticket", then the plural may make sense. "You will need to arrange flights [bookings/tickets] for yourself and James..."

1
  • Yes. I think this is what prompted my question. It is probably more straightforward if you say tickets, or bookings.
    – WS2
    May 17 '16 at 8:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.