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infix: implant or insert firmly in something, as in the particles of mercury will infix themselves in the structure of the other metal

How about the opposite? Is there something called outfix? I.e. encapsulate or surround firmly around something, as in the particles of mercury will outfix themselves around the structure of the other metal

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  • Do you really need infix in the first example? It seems to me that fix will work in either sentence.
    – Andrew Leach
    May 16 '16 at 10:41
  • @AndrewLeach Maybe not in that example (which was just what Google came up with for "infix"), but i would still want a way to distinguish the verbs in general. Do you have a better examples?
    – Adám
    May 16 '16 at 10:49
  • Infix is usually paired with prefix and suffix. I can't think of an example where fix around is not used for fixing around.
    – Andrew Leach
    May 16 '16 at 10:58
  • @AndrewLeach So aroundfix?
    – Adám
    May 16 '16 at 11:04
  • 3
    I'd suggest keeping the source language consistent (Latin) with circumfix, but I'd be surprised if that has any traction.
    – Andrew Leach
    May 16 '16 at 11:06

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