1

In person a person may say something like the following:

I would really like to hear what you have to say about X.

On a forum (or other forms of written communication), I often see similar ideas being expressed using the word "hear." Of course, with such communication, the vast majority of the people involved will actually read what the other person has to say. As such, I am looking for an alternative to "hear" that can be used as a drop-in replacement in as many cases as possible.

Also, I know I am probably being a bit pedantic by not just using "hear," but, I would still like to know something that can more accurately convey such ideas.

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    "I would really like to see what you have written about X." – ab2 May 10 '16 at 21:31
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    @vickyace that strongly implies (at least to me) that it is something that carefully needs to be observed or thought about. "It took some time to descern the exact way that this code works." – john01dav May 10 '16 at 21:57
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    "I'd be interesting in seeing anything you write about X." – ab2 May 10 '16 at 21:57
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    @vickyace it implies that whatever text is being referred to is somehow especially difficult to understand, which often isn't the case. – john01dav May 10 '16 at 22:04
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    read what you have to say, not hear what you have to say... – Drew May 11 '16 at 0:12
5

The word "see" fits in semantically with your example:

I would really like to see what you have to say about X.

This has a nice two-fold meaning, as Cambridge dictionary includes a meaning of "to understand" under the entry for "see":

[transitive verb]: to understand, know, or realize

and you would also literally use your eyes to see (read) the response.

4

Some alternatives are learn, find out, or know, for instance:

I would really like to find out what you think about X.

I like these because they work in any medium (speech, text, etc.).

If it's a context where a direct question is acceptable, you could also just say:

What do you think about X?

(P.S. I'm very new around here, so please be patient if I'm not answering or formatting as well as I might. This is also why this is an answer and not a comment.)

  • I didn't mean to post a duplicate answer. The browser was reloading. You deserve a vote up. – vickyace May 11 '16 at 1:02
1

I would really like to know what you have to say about X.

Do I even dare define that. You know when you see it. You know when you hear it. You know when you touch it.

1

You can write:

I would really like to learn what you have to say about X.

It is a little more formal and has the connotation of getting actually new information on a subject matter and not just an opinion.

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