7

Ex.

"She _______ed around campus, stopping at each familiar classroom to deliver a farewell gift to her teachers."

  • 3
    Are you looking for toured, or did the rounds? – Dan Bron May 7 '16 at 15:28
  • 3
    ran errands, shuttled? – NVZ May 7 '16 at 15:43
  • 1
    She "walked" if she walked and "ran" if she "ran". She "moved'. – user140086 May 7 '16 at 15:45
  • 1
    Was she in a vehicle, bicycle? Walked, ran, hurried, strolled, stormed? – NVZ May 7 '16 at 15:46
  • 1
    +1 for shuttled, I think that is an answer. Go, stop, go, stop, etc. – Phil Sweet May 7 '16 at 16:01
10

make/go the rounds

She made her rounds around campus, stopping at each familiar classroom to deliver a farewell gift to her teachers."

*make/go the rounds*
1. To go from place to place, as on business or for entertainment: 
    - a delivery truck making the rounds
    - students going the rounds in the entertainment district.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/rounds

Additionally, in the health care space, rounding is the act of a nurse or practitioner who checks up on patients at regular intervals.

https://americannursetoday.com/value-purposeful-rounding/

  • 1
    I would have said She made her rounds of the campus... to avoid repetition of round in around. – WS2 May 7 '16 at 16:47
  • @WS2 Good point, or even She made her rounds about campus – lux May 7 '16 at 16:48
6

Would there be anything wrong with saying:

She went around campus, stopping at each familiar classroom...?

Or is that too simple?

4

If you want to and are okay with it, you can squeeze a term from a technical field into regular conversation.

Try Milk run - a round trip that facilitates either distribution or collection.

Wikipedia link for milk run Also, search it and look around a bit.

3

Consider, she hopped around campus, stopping at each familiar classroom to deliver a farewell gift to her teachers.

hop

informal pass quickly from one place to another.

Oxford Dictionaries

2

You can try ramble.

To walk casually or leisurely.

This is number #2 meaning here with an example sentence: [She] rambled over to the neighbor's house.

This clearly shows intented action.


From Oxford dictionary:

Walk for pleasure, typically without a definite route.

  • @MartinSmith I was under the impression that the three numbered meanings are exclusive (logical OR between them, and not AND). – Matsmath May 7 '16 at 15:28
  • 2
    @Matsmath When there are multiple definitions, it's more useful for you to post just the one you're focusing on than to include ones that are irrelevant. – Lawrence May 7 '16 at 15:33
  • 1
    Even if so we have no particular reason to think that (2) or (3) apply anyway.To me "walk for pleasure in the countryside." would be more what rambling conjurs up anyway. Definitely not “moving place to place, stopping at each to make a delivery” – Martin Smith May 7 '16 at 15:34
  • @MartinSmith: That is a noun, you are quoting. I have improved my answer. – Matsmath May 7 '16 at 15:39
  • 1
    Rats, I take that back. I am somewhat surprised how the american English and [british] English pages are different: oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/ramble vs oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/ramble. – Matsmath May 7 '16 at 15:41
1

The usual (cliched?) phrasing would employ 'circulate':

She circulated around campus, stopping at each familiar classroom to deliver a farewell gift to her teachers.

In this sense, 'circulate' is intransitive, and has this meaning:

  1. To move around, as from person to person or place to place,

(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. S.v. "circulated." Retrieved May 7 2016 from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/circulated )

Your delivery connotations invoke a resonance with another--here indirect--transitive meaning of 'circulate':

  1. to cause to pass from place to place, person to person, etc.; disseminate; distribute.

(Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary. S.v. "circulated." Retrieved May 7 2016 from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/circulated )

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