1

Op's original question:

What would be correct and why?

a. "Do you know? Where can we get puff pastries from?"

b. "Do you know? Where we can get puff pastries from?"

Op's revised question (after some of the answers & comments):

What would be correct and why?

a. "Do you know, Where can we get puff pastries from?"

b. "Do you know, Where we can get puff pastries from?"

  • Technically, there is no question within a question in any of the above because there are two separate questions each under bullet a and b. A question mark (?) marks the end of a question or turns a statement into a question. Putting these aside, it is alright to ask a question within a question. – vickyace May 7 '16 at 10:54
  • "Do you know anything about pastries, and where can I get some?" sounds good. – vickyace May 7 '16 at 10:57
  • Op edited the question in such a way that some of the answers & comments already made would not make sense. I've therefore re-instated the original version & included Op's revised version also. – TrevorD May 7 '16 at 13:20
  • @TrevorD I revised your edit. – haykam May 7 '16 at 13:21
  • 1
    @Peanut I've rejected your revision: Op's revised version did include capital letters for 'Where'. I've attempted to reproduce his revised version exactly. – TrevorD May 7 '16 at 13:25
9

The correct form would be:

Do you know where we can get puff pastries from?

Or, slightly reworded (however, it means the same thing):

Do you know from where we can get puff pastries?

Your underlying question hinges on know where, so you can't just shudder to a halt after "know".

You could even just go to:

Where can we get puff pastries?

if you wanted to be both less formal and brief.

As written in your question, you have separate thoughts... "do you know?" doesn't automatically lead into the puff pastries.

Consider:

I was going to buy some pastries, but I've lost my keys. I asked John, but he hasn't a clue where they are. Do you know? Where can we get puff pastries from?

The do you know? in this context refers back to the knowledge of the keys' location (although there's obviously another "do you know?" implied when asking about a potential pastry-vending establishment, as you're enquiring about knowledge).

  • I rejected it, but too late. Will someone with enough rep please roll it back. The edit makes unnecessary changes to the essence of the author's response. The format changes are fine. – Phil Sweet May 7 '16 at 13:47
  • @PhilSweet what do you mean? – haykam May 7 '16 at 13:54
  • @Peanut The edit deleted a sentence that was a stand-alone answer to the the question. I think it should be put back in. I also don't like the added "(it means the same thing)" The author doesn't say that and it isn't factually supported in any way, It just appears as a random opinion that's been interjected. – Phil Sweet May 7 '16 at 14:03
0

Version a:

"Do you know? Where can we get puff pastries from?"

First sentence is incomplete: "Do you know ... what?"

Second sentence can stand alone: "Where can we get puff pastries from?"
But the "from" is superfluous: "Where can we get puff pastries?"

Combined as a single sentence: "Do you know where can we get puff pastries from?"
"Do you know where can we ..." is grammatically incorrect.

Version b:

"Do you know? Where we can get puff pastries from?"

As above, the first sentence is incomplete: "Do you know ... what?"
Second sentence cannot stand alone: "Where we can get puff pastries from?" (with or without the "from").

Combined as a single sentence: "Do you know where we can get puff pastries from?"
This is perfectly fine provided (i) there is no comma after "know", and (ii) "where" does not begin with a capital letter.
As before, the "from" is superfluous.

Summary - these are acceptable:

"Where can we get puff pastries [from]?
"Do you know where we can get puff pastries [from]?

P.S. I know this overlap in part with the answer from @Prof Yaffle, But I've intentionally approached it from a different angle, especially in the light of Op's revision to the question.

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