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I'm looking for the most natural way of saying that someone will agree to something if their demands are met and I'm not sure if each of these phrasings would sound grammatical and natural for the given meaning:

  • They conditioned their entry into the government on/with the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions.
  • They made their entry into the government conditional on the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions.
  • They stipulated their entry into the government with the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions.
  • They required/insisted on the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions as a condition of their entry into the government.

Thank you for the help!

closed as off-topic by tchrist, NVZ, MetaEd, user66974, Dan Bron Jul 27 '16 at 13:46

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Several of the variations you offered would be fine:

They conditioned their entry into the government on the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions.

They made their entry into the government conditional on the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions.

They insisted on the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions as a condition of their entry into the government.

The variation with "stipulated" is not correct usage, but this rewording would work:

Their agreement to enter into the government stipulated the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions.

@NDubonix's suggestion of "contingent" works, too.

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Perhaps "contingent"/"contingent on"

Something like...

"Their entry was contingent on the appointment of two of their candidates to ministerial positions"

  • Thank you for the answer NDubonix! Do the suggestions I offered work for you? Also, I'd like the phrasing to convey the meaning that they insist on their candidates being appointed to ministerial positions, rather than putting it impersonally. – Rejlan Givens May 6 '16 at 20:27

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