5

I hear "Me, myself and I" idiom from time to time.

Here this idiom is described as emphasis only. Are there any other meanings? What cases is it suitable for?

  • Please show what research you have done before asking the question. – TrevorD May 6 '16 at 12:35
  • 2
    This is used to emphasize one's aloneness. – MorganFR May 6 '16 at 12:36
  • @TrevorD, i've update the question – Dmitriy Simushev May 6 '16 at 12:47
3

Me-myself-and-I:

  • only me, me alone, me without companionship.

Usage notes:

  • This is used to emphasise the speaker's aloneness.

(Your.dictionary.com)

Usage examples:

  • 1988, John Byrum, Cells: I like things the way they are: just me, myself, and I. No complicated organs and systems and such. Give me the simple life.
  • 2011, Isaiah Jamal Borgum, Obstacles, Lessions, & Hope: Here I was all alone, no one to help me get over my mom's and sister's death, just me myself and I. It was as if I died and all I could see was black.

(Wiktionary)

Origin:

  • "Me, Myself and I" is one of the great classic songs of Billie Holiday, and the phrase stuck with us. It written by Irving Gordon, Allan Roberts and Alvin Kaufman on June 15, 1937.
3

When you do something strictly on your own, and you want to emphasize that.

e.g: Q: Who was at your birtdhay? A: Me, myself and I.

-2

Me is the physical aspects. Myself is the soulful aspects. I is the spiritual aspects. All three combined is the trinity and essence of one entity, the divine human spirit. We are 3 dimensional beings.

  • Welcome to English Language & Usage! Please explain your answer, preferably with some supporting statements and references. While opinions are valued, they are not of much help as answers. – NVZ Sep 11 '16 at 23:45
  • As a native British English speaker. this is certainly not what I mean when I use the phrase or what I understand when I hear it. As others answers have said, it just emphasizes aloneness. – Martin Bonner supports Monica Oct 23 '17 at 7:25

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