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....with his easy cooking techniques and added element of fun he is able to entertain every viewer, whether they are beginners or experienced cooks, young or old, Indian or not.

closed as off-topic by Chenmunka, NVZ, Phil Sweet, tchrist Sep 2 '16 at 21:00

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  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – Chenmunka, NVZ, Phil Sweet, tchrist
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The comma indicates that what follows is information that is not necessary to understand the meaning of the sentence, and in this case, that seems apt. Every viewer by definition includes both beginners and experienced cooks, young and old, Indian and otherwise. The subordinate clause--the part that begins with whether--is specifying who the viewers are, but it does not add anything to or otherwise modify every viewer. The terms Every viewer and beginners or experienced cooks, young or old, Indian or not are, rhetorically speaking, equivalent, identical, one in the same. The comma, in this instance, is correct.

Some would say you should have a comma following the word fun--this too would mark the onset on a new clause.

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The commas are fine (though the one after “viewer” is optional), and so is your use of the interrogative subordinator "whether".

The subordinate interrogative whether clause is an 'exhaustive conditional adjunct'. It follows that he is able to entertain the viewers if they are young, old, Indian and non-Indian beginners and he is able entertain the viewers if they are young, old, Indian and non-Indian experienced cooks. Those conditions exhaust the options, so we know he is able entertain every viewer.

It's called the 'exhaustive conditional construction' because it uses an interrogative clause to express a set of conditions that exhaustively cover the possibilities. An interrogative clause is used here because it expresses a question whose answers define an exhaustive set of conditions. The question is “Is he able to entertain young, old … beginners and is he able to entertain young, old … experienced cooks"?

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