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I am writing a sentence like:

Show clients your largesse with a gift of equal proportion.

Is it right in a formal sense or is it a little condescending? Is there another way to write it?

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It depends on the audience you are writing this to. But, you could say something like:

It is customary and appropriate to provide gifts or favor of equal proportion to one's guests, as a display of reciprocity, respect, or mutual affection.

Largess does have an air of superiority and condescension about it, and I would avoid it.

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Largesse, like noblesse oblige, suggests that the donor is extending not from charity but from an exaggerated sense of his own superiority. If you don't mean it that way, find another word.

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Yes, it is condescending. Largesse means:

liberal giving (as of money) to or as if to an inferior

[Merriam-Webster]

Certainly you wouldn't want to insinuate that the clients are inferior. Instead, consider:

Show clients your gratitude/appreciation with a gift of equal proportion.

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