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One meaning for clip is a short part of a film or television program (Longman, retrieved 4/21/2016). But, clipper does not refer to a meaning close to film clips. Can I use, however, clipper to refer to someone whose hobby is making, watching and distributing clips, for example on Youtube? If no, what would be the alternatives?

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    You can use whatever you like. But do bear in mind that the word has multiple other meanings. – WS2 Apr 21 '16 at 12:58
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    It may sound like that is the correct word for what you are describing, someone who clips things. But that word is already used for 'tools that clip' like 'hair clippers' or 'hedge clippers'. So you would be misunderstood even when context would point to your desired meaning. 'Editor' or 'video editor' is closer to what you want. – Mitch Apr 21 '16 at 13:03
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    Clipper has indeed historically been used for someone who clips things, namely the edges of coins, illegally, for precious metals. But for this application I think YouTubers is the established term. – Brian Donovan Apr 21 '16 at 13:10
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    YouTuber or Content Creator are the most commonly used terms. – SGR Apr 21 '16 at 13:28
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    @sgr If it's specifically on YouTube, then yes, YouTuber is a term I've heard and that, in any case, would likely be instantly understood. If YouTube is just an example and the OP wants a word that means someone who produces and shares video clips anywhere, I don't think "YouTuber" would be broad enough. – Jay Apr 21 '16 at 14:06
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That is not an established meaning of the word "clipper". If you used the word to mean that, no one but you would know what you are talking about.

The word "clipper" is commonly understood to refer to certain cutting tools, usually those with two connected blades, like scissors or a "hedge clipper" or "nail clippers". By extension it is used for electrical cutting devices that have largely replaced scissors for cutting hair, "hair clipper". It also can mean a type of fast sailing ship.

I don't know of any widely-recognized word that expresses the idea you are looking for.

You could, of course, try to create this new meaning of the word and get others to use it. Inventing new words and getting others to use them is hard. You'd have an advantage here because there is no existing word you'd be replacing.

If you are looking for a word to use in one book or article, it's much easier. At the beginning you can say, "In this book I will use the word 'clipper' to mean ..." Then the reader knows what you're talking about and it doesn't matter that it's not an accepted word.

  • There is a "coupon clipper" in the financial world <a href="financial-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/… clipping</a> – Icy Apr 21 '16 at 13:37
  • True. Sadly, I will probably never be one. There may be other definitions out there, but as I say, not the one the OP is asking about. – Jay Apr 21 '16 at 13:41

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