8

In the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team.

Or

On the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team .

closed as off-topic by Centaurus, Hot Licks, Kristina Lopez, Drew, NVZ Apr 22 '16 at 4:02

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  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not a question. – Hot Licks Apr 21 '16 at 12:01
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    @HotLicks, it's good question, because it's tricky usage here, especially to non-native English speakers. – Farside Apr 21 '16 at 12:03
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    @Hot Licks Usage of English language is a question, are you making like new definitions of questions round here. – therewillbecoffee Apr 21 '16 at 12:05
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    @HotLicks, may be you can suggest an improvement to meet your criteria, and update the question itself? I vote to keep it. It's a good question and is a really tricky moment. – Farside Apr 21 '16 at 12:11
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    @WS2 It seems that the question was edited after the comment. – user140086 Apr 21 '16 at 14:11
9

"on" is the correct preposition and "in" is the incorrect one for this case.

"The morning of" functions as an adjectival phrase clarifying the specific time and date "on 19 April 2016". "On" is used because it belongs to the date here, specific part of the day.

The normal language constructions would be:

  • on + date (with the year or without it) or day of the week
  • in + morning, afternoon, evening (in the morning, in the evening)

But, when we talk about a specific morning, afternoon, or when we describe the part of the day it should be used with on:

  • on the morning of [date],

You can't say "I will see you on the morning" - it's incorrect.

here's the proof: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/at-on-and-in-time

In or on?

We use in with morning, afternoon, evening and night, but we use on when we talk about a specific morning, afternoon, etc., or when we describe the part of the day.

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    That construction thing certainly helps, I'm a native speaker but the complexities are often lost upon me. – therewillbecoffee Apr 21 '16 at 12:06
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    But we do say in the morning when we specifically mean tomorrow morning. Or If you are going to Henry's Friday afternoon, I will see you in the morning (of Friday). This is a devilishly complex area for non-natives to grasp. – WS2 Apr 21 '16 at 13:06
  • @WS2, you are correct, that's why I provided several cases in my answer, when there is used on and when in. In is used with parts of the day, months, seasons, years. But on will be used with public holidays, weekends, when the talk is about a particular special day... and the case which I covered above - we talk about a specific morning, afternoon, etc., or when we describe the part of the day. – Farside Apr 21 '16 at 20:47
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    @Farside +1. It's late at night, but I think you have covered most of it. – WS2 Apr 22 '16 at 0:02

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