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I’ve seen this picture of a leaflet being tweeted today. It’s supposedly issued by the UK government and distributed widely:

The referendum is a once in a generation decision. The Government believes it is in you and your family’s best interests that the UK remains in the European Union.

Am I overlooking something or does it really contain the grammar error discussed in "You and your" vs. "Your and your"?

I could see the possessive ’s applying to the whole phrase

it is in (you and your family)’s best interests,

because the plural interests wouldn’t properly match singular your, i.e. it’s a short form of either of

  • it is in your best interest and in your family’s best interest
  • it is in your best interest and in your family’s best interests

instead of

  • it is in your best interests and in your family’s best interests
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    It's a typo probably. Also, it should read: once-in-a-generation decision. The EU is well known for this kind of scrappy writing. – Lambie Apr 18 '16 at 21:09
  • @Lambie Yes, I would have put hyphens there, too, but then I’m German. I would also have expected either “June 23rd, 2016” or “23 June 2016”, but I’m not well versed in British conventions. Please spare the rants for elsewhere. – Crissov Apr 18 '16 at 21:16
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    @SimonB. When a non-native speaker asks a serious question about correct English usage you should not dismiss this as "pedantry". Some people do actually care about good English. – fdb Apr 18 '16 at 23:33
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    @Lambie You say "The EU is well known for this kind of scrappy writing.", but it's a leaflet from the British Government - not from the EU! – TrevorD Apr 18 '16 at 23:38
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    @Crissov You state "the plural interests wouldn’t properly match singular your". "Interests" is very commonly used in the plural because each person has multiple interests. – TrevorD Apr 18 '16 at 23:43
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"I could see the possessive ’s applying to the whole phrase"

You are right. This is normal idiomatic English. Like "the girl I used to go with's father".

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