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I want to be careful sending my email to the whole department. I need to be sure my word usage are correctly used. Is my sentence below correctly worded?

If your name is not on the list, and would like to get one, please notify me.

closed as off-topic by John Clifford, Mari-Lou A, Hellion, Julie Carter, ab2 Apr 11 '16 at 23:33

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – John Clifford, Mari-Lou A, Hellion, Julie Carter, ab2
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Proofreading questions are considered off-topic; if you have a particular concern with the way you've worded this, please edit your question to ask about it. For the record, right now your sentence parses as "If your name is not on the list, and [your name] would like to get one [of something unclear, possibly the list], please notify me.". Names usually don't desire anything, so it certainly isn't correct. – John Clifford Apr 11 '16 at 14:50
  • "If your name is not on the list, and you want it to be, please notify me." – ab2 Apr 11 '16 at 23:33
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The correct phrasing would be "If your name is not on the list, and you would like to get one, please notify me."

If you use the sentence you suggested, it would read like "If your name is not on the list, and your name would like to get one, please notify me", because if you don't use another noun, the noun used in the first part of the sentence applies to the second.

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This question is off-topic. But, I would rephrase as:

If your name is not on the list but you would like to add it, notify me.

or

If your name is not on the list but you would like it added, notify me.

or maybe even,

If your name is not on the list but you would like to participate, notify me.

  • Changing 'and' to 'but' is not needed when coordinating with a hypothetical (if). – AmI Apr 11 '16 at 21:23

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