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In Robert Louis Stevenson poem, Youth And Love: I., there is a line that I can't quite understand.

and the bright eyes of danger.

Here is the complete poem:

Once only by the garden gate
Our lips we joined and parted.
I must fulfil an empty fate
And travel the uncharted.

Hail and farewell!  I must arise,
Leave here the fatted cattle,
And paint on foreign lands and skies
My Odyssey of battle.

The untented Kosmos my abode,
I pass, a wilful stranger:
My mistress still the open road
And the bright eyes of danger.

Come ill or well, the cross, the crown,
The rainbow or the thunder,
I fling my soul and body down
For God to plough them under.

What exactly is RLS referring to with this line?

Is he simply referring to embracing the danger inherent in taking on the open road or exploring the unknown?

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    His (metaphorical) mistress is double-headed: The open road and a bright-eyed woman who represents danger. The bright eyes are especially enticing. – Hot Licks Apr 9 '16 at 23:40
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This piece is a very dramatic, beautiful piece of writing, full of metaphors and other tricks of the trade. Imagine if he had written this:

The untented Kosmos my abode,

I pass, a wilful stranger:

My mistress still the open road

And danger.

He could hardly say all those witty, inspirational things, then conclude with a simple "and danger." He had to spice it up somehow.

He could have said "and the grinning face of danger," "and the gods of danger," or whatever. He just settled on "bright eyes" as an appropriate way to characterize danger.

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think about this poem in a Platonic sense, Birghtness could mean waking up from darkness to the truth. Having been in a cave for a long time, if you look at the sun for the first time, there is a danger you will be blinded, but once your eyes are acquainted to the true light, the truth shall be revealed. There is also a sense of dualism where he says,

I fling my soul and body down For God to plough them under.

Meaning that god may do as he wills with his body and soul; he is in an audacious, visceral and spiritual man in search for enlightment that he even renounced to love for more spiritual things. Or even if the notion is is different and he flings his sould and body down; there is still a sense of rendition, of surrender, of desintegrat-to-integrate, and delivery to the universe... He wishes to combine and be one with things and know the truth.

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