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What is the idiom for "throne always succeed by their sons only"?

What i means is: there is no chance for new talents.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Nathaniel, NVZ, sumelic, Rob_Ster, Dan Bron Apr 9 '16 at 2:33

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    Welcome to English Language & Usage! Your question is lacking in info. Could you elaborate more on what you mean, with more examples and research that you may have done? – SuperBiasedMan Apr 8 '16 at 11:59
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    Is this already an idiom in your first language? Can you give more detail about this? – Mitch Apr 8 '16 at 12:27
  • Turning it on it's ear: The acorn doesn't fall very far from the tree. – Hot Licks Apr 8 '16 at 13:30
  • There’s my newly coined. “If you don’t have an in, you’re out.” don’t know if anyone has said this before, it’d be astounding if they hadn’t but who knows. – Jim Apr 9 '16 at 0:47
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A common idiom is 'It's a closed shop.'

Although this applies in the first instance to trades unions and working practices, the expression is used far more broadly to describe a situation involving nepotism, elitism, selectivism and the like.

Such an example is this one from the Irish Times:

"IT MAY not be the largest trout competition but it’s up there with the best,” a sentiment echoed time and time again at last week’s vintner’s fly-fishing championship on Lough Mask in Co Mayo. While the world cup competition sets claim to the greatest number of anglers (460 this year), the vintners is an absolute gem. It’s a closed shop, by invite only. “There are 50 or 60 on the waiting list,” according to organiser Tom “Swanky” Sweeney.

And one from the IMDb message board:

The reality of getting a script from paper to screen is a gigantic step for known writers let alone unknown ones.

Hollywood is virtually a closed shop.

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You might consider, blood is thicker than water

Blood is thicker than water. and Blood runs thicker than water.

Prov. People who are related have stronger obligations to each other than to people outside the family.

McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

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You may be thinking of an oligarchy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oligarchy

It generally refers to a small group of people, but there's no reason that small group couldn't be a family.

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