0

does "the COLLAPSE of the soviet union" have a negative or postive connotation? I am looking for a neutral expresion.

Thanks for your suggestions

closed as off-topic by tchrist, Nathaniel, cobaltduck, Drew, choster Apr 6 '16 at 15:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    It depends on your perspective whether this was good or bad. – James McLeod Apr 6 '16 at 10:45
  • Did you look for alternatives in a thesaurus? – Mitch Apr 6 '16 at 12:21
  • "Collapse" generally implies "failure". – Hot Licks Apr 6 '16 at 12:27
  • Well, that's impossible. If you have a political entity, a complete whole, and it comes to an end, I cannot think of a neutral expression to refer to that. It breaks up, it comes apart, it separates into constituent parts, it divides up into parts, and so on. Isn't – Lambie Apr 6 '16 at 13:41
  • @Lambie - "Dissolve" would be about the least pejorative term for the breakup of a government. – Hot Licks Apr 7 '16 at 23:45
1

Formally, there's the dissolution, but that happened as a result of the collapse, yes?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissolution_of_the_Soviet_Union

0

The term collapse can be used in a neutral or positive way

The collapse of the building being demolished went exactly as planned.

However, when describing an institution (or a person), the term does seem to have a negative connotation.

(Of an institution or undertaking) fail suddenly and completely: in the face of such resolve his opposition finally collapsed

Oxford Dictionaries Online

Failure tends to be negative.

Perhaps the term devolution may suit

The transfer or delegation of power to a lower level, especially by central government to local or regional administration.

Oxford Dictionaries Online

-2

To me "collapse" is similar in meaning to "failure" in this context, and therefore is negative. For a neutral expression i'd suggest "breakup" (as a noun, use "break up" for the verb).

Technically, also, i don't think that the Soviet Union itself collapsed. You could say that communism collapsed I think, as this is the social institution, whereas the Soviet Union was more of a geographical institution. I'm not sure about this though.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.