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I found two different news publishers using different prepositions for the same sentence.

The first one says: "Four Additional Judges Appointed to Bombay High Court"

Other says: "Four Additional Judges Appointed in Bombay High Court"

Though, I found the use of 'appointed to' more frequent but there are also few cases where one can see the use of 'appointed in'.

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The first link in the OP's question goes to a version of the article that appeared in the Economic Times (evidently an affiliate of the India Times, and the second link goes to a version of the article at NetIndian.com. It is possible that the former periodical aims for a more international readership than the latter (assuming that expressions of the form "Judges Appointed in Bombay High Court" are common in parts of India but not elsewhere), or it may be that the latter simply made an odd and idiosyncratic choice of prepositions for reasons unknown (assuming that such expressions are as rare in India as they are in North America).

I don't know what the preferences are in India for expressions of the forms that you ask about, but in the United States and Canada, where I have lived, the expression "Four Additional Judges Appointed in Bombay High Court" would be an appropriate title only if the article was about the appointment of four judges to some (unnamed) court in a ceremony that took place physically in the Bombay High Court.

In contrast, the wording "Four Additional Judges Appointed to Bombay High Court" would be immediately familiar to many native speakers of North American English as a way of saying that the authorities had filled four vacancies on the Bombay High Court by appointing four judges to occupy the open seats on that court.

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