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I'm working on a web development/design agency and English is my second language. I wanted to know if the usage of this phrase suits the purpose: "tailor made". In our case, we want to say that our code is so unique that people would feel it as if it were done by a tailor.

Thanks!

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    "Tailor made" means made by a tailor rather than "off the rack". In British terms "bespoke". "Custom made" is another term. Of course, if you use "tailor made" when the code is not, in fact, substantially made/altered to fit each individual customer then your customers may view your use of the term to be deceptive. – Hot Licks Apr 4 '16 at 20:08
  • Thanks! I will use another catchy phrase to emphasize that the code is unique and adapted to the customer's needs. – Jhoseth Rodriguez Apr 4 '16 at 20:10
  • It's reasonable to use the adjective "tailored" (or "custom-tailored"), as this means "fitted by a tailor", as might be done with an "off the rack" suit in an upscale men's store. Ie, the suit is from a factory, but the on-site tailor sets the cuffs on the pant legs, adjusts sleeve length, etc. One does need to be a bit careful of creating the mistaken impression of "tailor made" when using "tailored", though. – Hot Licks Apr 5 '16 at 22:19
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The adjective "tailor-made" is defined by oxforddictionaries.com as:

Made, adapted, or suited for a particular purpose or person.

So if your code is indeed custom-made for each individual customer, you might correctly say that it is tailor-made. If, however, you license the same program, with very few changes, to more than one customer, it is not appropriate to say that the program is tailor-made.

In general, the term is not really used to imply quality, but rather merely specificity.

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  • That's a better answer than the previous one. Thank you so very much. Actually, that is indeed the point. – Jhoseth Rodriguez Apr 4 '16 at 20:11

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