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The kuma is the kid that lingers around you when you're eating ice cream. He/She wants the ice cream for himself/herself. Could be a brother, sister or a complete stranger. Sometimes would make a fuss so that his/her mom would buy him/her one or, if not, ask you for him/her a piece of what you are eating.

As an adjective, kuma is how you'd describe that kid. Curious is too cute, greedy is extreme.

Here comes the kuma.

My child's seatmate in class is super kuma.

Also applies to adults.

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    What language is that from? – dukerasputin Apr 4 '16 at 5:18
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    Kuma sounds like a good English word for that. Sorry, we just stole it. – Drew Apr 5 '16 at 0:14
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mooch

To ask for and get things from other people without paying for them or doing anything for them.

"Mooch." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 4 Apr. 2016.

Applies to children and adults.

Sponge is similar but usually refers to money, not food.

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    This can used as both a noun and (more commonly) a verb in my experience, but not an adjective. You might want to add some examples to clarify this. – ApproachingDarknessFish Apr 4 '16 at 8:23
  • Yes, it's not an adjective. With several good nouns to choose from, I guess we don't often need one. Sponge and mooch emphasize the unbalanced nature of the exchange. Sponge implies habitual, often strategic and subtle attempts to get someone to give you money. Sponging often relies on taking advantage of a relationship through wheedling or blandishments. Mooching tends to be more opportunistic and blatant. In the Caribbean, there are limers. Limin' is one thing (not really a bad thing), but calling someone a limer is saying they are too lazy to be a decent bum. They sponge off people. – Phil Sweet Apr 4 '16 at 13:47
0

Consider, bum(mer)

Slang. One who begs habitually or for a living.

The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus

0

Groak/groaking

It's a verb, but other than that, it's the exact word you're looking for.

Definition from Urban Dictionary:

To stare silently at someone while they are eating, in the hopes that they will give you some of their food.

Always careful not to establish eye contact with potential groakers, Mark wolfed down the last of his mother's famous apple pie.

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