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Please join us Monday, August 1, 2016, for the 4th Annual Tee It Up for Down Syndrome Golf Tournament at Deer Run Golf Club in Victoria, Minnesota

Do I need a comma before and after the date?

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    This is exactly the problem with the American date format. Write it as "...join us on Monday 1 August 2016 for the 4th Annual..." and the problem disappears. I'd be happy to see your commas disappear as you suggest, but then I'm not American. – Andrew Leach Mar 28 '16 at 17:46
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Well the following would do too..

Please join us, Monday August 1 2016, for the 4th Annual Tee It Up for Down Syndrome Golf Tournament at Deer Run Golf Club in Victoria, Minnesota

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  • Why would you separate a restrictive element, the date, from what it modifies? – deadrat Mar 28 '16 at 18:14
  • the date is adverbial, not restrictive – AmI Mar 28 '16 at 22:30
  • @deadrat You could argue that Monday August 1 2016 is a parenthesis; brackets or dashes would not be incorrect, so I suppose commas can't be either. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 28 '16 at 22:52
  • @AmI These are not mutually exclusive categories. The date is not an aside, it's definitional . – deadrat Mar 29 '16 at 0:05
  • @EdwinAshworth I'm guessing the second person pronoun is either indeterminate or projectional. I would never argue that the date is a parenthesis. Not with regard to the 4th Annual Tee It Up, anyway. – deadrat Mar 29 '16 at 0:07
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Like all punctuation issues, this is a matter of style, particularly for a venue as informal as the Deer Run Golf Club. For what it's worth, the Chicago Manual of Style frowns on the day-date-year format, but if you insist, advises using commas to set off the date fore and aft, as you've done.

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